Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Warner Archive Instant Cult Picks - DEATH IN SMALL DOSES and MRS. BROWN YOU'VE GOT A LOVELY DAUGHTER ""

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Warner Archive Instant Cult Picks - DEATH IN SMALL DOSES and MRS. BROWN YOU'VE GOT A LOVELY DAUGHTER

DEATH IN SMALL DOSES(1957; Joseph M. Newman)
I feel like it was my friend Ned over at the Obscure One-Sheet Blog that first mentioned this film to me a few years ago. It was, at the time, a very tricky film to see as it hadn't(to my knowledge) ever gotten any home video release at all(no VHS even). I finally got a chance to catch it via TCM last year and it was just a hoot. I've oft described it as being sorta like REEFER MADNESS meets WHITE LINE FEVER, but with 'bennies' instead of weed. It's a "Trucker Noir" so to speak. Heading up the cast is the always solid Peter Graves, and he does fine here. The most memorable (and truly nutball) performance comes in the form of a supporting turn from Chuck Connors. Dude is just outta control in this movie. I won't go into it much further except to say SEE THIS FILM. Hoping it'll become more of a camp/cult favorite since Warner Archive put out their DVD last year and now it's found its way to instant streaming in HD!


MRS. BROWN, YOU'VE GOT A LOVELY DAUGHTER (1968; Saul Swimmer)
Herman's Hermits were one of many British Invasion bands to rise to prominence in the wake of Beatlemania. While not nearly as charming or talented as the Fab Four, they had their hits in the mid 60s (the first of which being a cover of "I'm Into Something Good" by Earl Jean). "Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter" was certainly their next most well-known song after that one and it was a staple of the oldies station I used to listen to in high school. In the loosest of loos plotlines, the Hermits must travel around playing gigs in order to raise cash to pay the entrance fee to race their prize greyhound (she's called 'Mrs. Brown' herself). MRS. BROWN is a follow-up film to the Hermits' HOLD ON! which came out in 1966. Of the two films, MRS. BROWN is certainly the more interesting and more fun. I've always found it interesting though that said fun kind of flies in the face of the spirit of the song itself as it is kind of a downer (albeit a catchy one). Regardless, if you're a fan of this sort of energetic, 1960s fluffiness, then this may be just the ticket for you (and I also do love that it was shot in 2.35 to 1 widescreen).


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