Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Film Discoveries of 2015 - Peter Jewkes ""

Saturday, February 13, 2016

Film Discoveries of 2015 - Peter Jewkes

Peter Jewkes (aka Hippowithhiccupsredux) has been obsessed with movies since he was 10 yrs old & his dad took him to the library to see Lon Chaney in THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA.  He has seen a movie a day for approximately the last 30 years.  He posts fanatically to Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/hippowithhiccupsredux/
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LAUGHTER IN THE DARK (1969) - Tony Richardson's stunning version of the Nabokov novel featuring astounding performances by Nicol Williamson & Anna Karina.

STAVISKY... - A dynamite Jean Paul Belmondo as the notorious 1920s swindler in this Alain Resnais buried treasure.  Charles Boyer co-stars and there is an oddball music score by none other than Stephen Sondheim.

CRAZY JOE (1974) - Peter Boyle has the title role as "crazy" Joe Gallo in this Italian made/New York set mafia bloodbath.  Exciting, weird, extremely well acted by Boyle, Rip Torn, Eli Wallach and Paula Prentiss.  

IN A LONELY PLACE (1950) - Certainly one of the strangest film noirs!  Humphrey Bogart is a screenwriter with a lot of anger management issues who may or may not have comitted a murder...much to the horror of Gloria Grahame.  Directed by Nicholas Ray.

LE CHAT (1971) - Love fades! Denys dela Patelliere's film of a marriage that has list its lustre in the most horrifying way for Simone Signoret & Jean Gabin.

WHERE LOVE HAS GONE (1964) - A masterpiece of high-strung camp.  Socialite sculpture Susan Hayward endures a bad marriage to war hero/alcoholic Mike Connors.  Hayward smokes a lot, Connors yells a lot and Bette Davis (as Hayward's mom) wears a lot of weird clothes.

THE HIRELING (1973) - Class structure run wild.  Robert Shaw is the chauffer for the not so stable Sarah Miles.  Mayhem ensues when Shaw "mis-reads" signals from Miles.

1 comment:

beamish13 said...

Great pics. Such a shame that Laughter in the Dark is stuck in purgatory and can't get an official DVD release. The British Film Institute screened it in 35mm last year