Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Underrated '66 - Joe Gibson ""

Monday, October 24, 2016

Underrated '66 - Joe Gibson

Joe is a tireless regular contributor here at RPS and he made countless list for this site over the years. He is a true RPS hero.
He can be found on Letterboxd (a highly recommended follow) here: http://letterboxd.com/zoltarak/.
See his Underrated '96 and '86 lists here:
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2016/03/underrated-96-joe-gibson.html
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2016/05/underrated-86-joe-gibson.html
----------
I sat out the 1976 list because I kept seeing all my favorites pop up on other people's lists - I don't think that's going to be as much of a problem with '66, a much less cool year for movies but populated with a lot of oddball stuff.



THE BIG GUNDOWN
One of my dreams is to start a cable channel called Sergiomax, programmed exclusively with violent movies directed by guys named Sergio. This one would be one of the cornerstones of our programming block, particularly on Lee Van Cleef Day (which I think would have to come at least once a week for practical reasons).
Amazon Button (via NiftyButtons.com)

THE SWORD OF DOOM
A decisive strike against the "needs a likeable hero" crowd, so much so that it almost seems downright antagonistic towards its audience. Kurosawa vet Tatsuya Nakadai plays the sneering protagonist to perfection, and it all leads up to a chaotic bloodbath that seems to predict the darker, more violent action movies that were in 1966 still in the future.
Amazon Button (via NiftyButtons.com)

FAHRENHEIT 451
The general line on Truffaut's sole Hollywood/English language production is that it's an interesting misfire, but the last time I watched it (admittedly a while ago) I was struck by how much Hitchcock there is in it. Check out the scene when Montag's wife overdoses and the camera follows him through his house, picking up an absurd amount of telephones.
Amazon Button (via NiftyButtons.com)

THE GLASS BOTTOM BOAT
I've been watching (and reading - check out his children's books if you haven't!) a lot of Frank Tashlin stuff over the last couple years, and I can't claim this as one of the best. But you probably want to watch a 1966 Technicolor spy spoof starring Doris Day anyway, especially when it's got generous helpings of Tashlin's trademark gags. My favorite is a wordless cameo from a certain icon of 1960s spy TV (no, not Bill Cosby) that I'm not going to spoil.
Amazon Button (via NiftyButtons.com)

QUEEN OF BLOOD
Goofy astro-corn is nevertheless a movie about a space vampire so automatically well worth your time. If it's not a patch on Lifeforce or Planet of the Vampires, well, how could it be? But take a look at this cast: John Saxon, Basil Rathbone, Dennis Hopper! And all of them powerless in sharing the screen with Florence Marly as the titular Queen of Blood.
Amazon Button (via NiftyButtons.com)

KISS THE GIRLS AND MAKE THEM DIE
Another spy spoof, this one more in a conventionally satisfying adventure vein. Some amazing location shooting too, particularly an early set-piece on top of the Christ the Redeemer statue. One for the Terry-Thomas highlight reel.

AS LONG AS YOU'VE GOT YOUR HEALTH
This is a comedy-anthology film from Pierre Etaix, and even though it's not as great as Yoyo it's got some great stuff in it. My absolute favorite is the chapter entitled "Insomnia," which is a typically uncomfortable Etaix depiction of that particular ailment, with a haze of cigarette smoke and a juicy-looking vampire novel being two of the primary forces keeping Pierre awake at night. A good one to check out with Halloween coming up, if that interests you.
Amazon Button (via NiftyButtons.com)

No comments: