Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Underrated '66 - Cinemonster ""

Friday, October 7, 2016

Underrated '66 - Cinemonster

Fancy Film Fella and Booze Aficionado, Cinemonster can be stalked on Twitter @ElCinemonster or at Letterboxd
Check out his website here:
BringmetheheadofGDT.com

Check out his Underrated '85 from last year here:
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2015/03/underrated-85-cinemonster.html

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Black Girl (1966)
​The first sub-Saharan film to reach an international audience, Black Girl addresses racism and the legacy of colonialism in both Africa and Europe. For this film alone director OusmaneSembene is one of the most important filmmakers of the 20th century, and this film shares that designation.

Khartoum (1966)
​An often forgotten film, Khartoum is the film that Cleopatra ruined. Everyone thought the Middle Eastern epic had a compelling true story at its core and great potential, but no one wanted to be the guy who signed of on a film that brought down a studio. It finally got made as a spectacle done on a shoestring. It is a gorgeous and well-acted film that smacked of old Hollywood, and features Charlton Heston, Laurence Olivier and Ralph Richardson. The last Super Panavision film until Hateful Eight.

Rat Pfink and Boo Boo (1966)
​There is a Rat Cycle, a kidnapping by a gorilla and a great chase scene. What more do you need? Ray Dennis Steckler writes, directs, produces and shoots one of the 10 best superhero films ever made.

Come Drink with Me (1966)
​A film from the likes of King Hu and Run RunShaw should be at the forefront of film consciousness, especially Hong Kong cinema, but sadly the 60s isntthe enduring and embraced period that the late 80s/early 90s is. Secret kung fu societies, tremendous action, beautiful cinematography and a great female lead make Come Drink with Me the greatest film from Hong Kong’s greatest director.

Django Shoots First (1966)
​A departure from the Eastwood clones of the time, Django Shoots first explores a more complicated relationship between gunfighters, as well as less traditional motives than those seen in Spag Westerns of the time. A fun cast and great Bruno Nicolai score make this a must see.

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