Rupert Pupkin Speaks: June 2017 ""

Friday, June 30, 2017

Just The Discs - Bonus Episode - THEY LIVE BY NIGHT on Blu-ray from Criterion

On this episode, I spotlighted Nicholas Ray's remarkable debut film THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (1949) and the new Criterion Collection Blu-ray release.
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Thursday, June 29, 2017

Underrated '47 - Kristina Dijan

Kristina Dijan is a movie addict and collector who shares her viewing on Letterboxd (http://letterboxd.com/HQofK/ ) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/HQofK), writes at Speakeasy (https://hqofk.wordpress.com/ ) The Dark Pages and elsewhere.

Check out her other RPS lists here:
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/search/label/Kristina%20Dijan

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1947 was a great year for essential noirs: Out of the Past, Born to Kill, The Lady From Shanghai, Nightmare Alley, Lady in the Lake, Ride the Pink Horse and more. Here are a few more crime movies from that year that you may not know, but should:

It Always Rains on Sunday (1947; Robert Hamer)
A fantastic British noirish melodrama about one family’s mundane love and work struggles unfolding while unbeknownst to them, wife and mother Googie Withers is hiding her fugitive ex John McCallum in their home. In 24 hours, Withers has several nail-biting close calls with her criminal house guest while her busy little boy and warring step-daughters zip in and out, and hubby comes home unexpectedly. There’s a warehouse robbery, an attempt to fence the goods, all while a determined, amiable policeman Jack Warner works the case. Boxing, bookies, bad boyfriends, dance-halls, darts at the pub, adultery, stolen skates and a thrilling railyard chase to end that “average” post-war Sunday.
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Ivy (1947; Sam Wood)
Joan Fontaine’s husband Richard Ney is broke and boring but he won't divorce her; she dumps her lover, doctor Patric Knowles, but he’s too obsessed to ever let her go, and millionaire Herbert Marshall is perfect for her but too principled to go for a married woman. So Fontaine decides to solve all three problems with murder, poisoning one inconvenient man, then implicating and testifying against the other. As she tries to get out of the trap society has set for women of that era, she sets herself an inescapable one instead. Excellent suspense and superb cast (Una O’Connor great as a fortune teller); Fontaine is excellent, doing bad deeds in gorgeous gowns, with enough panic and charm to earn your sympathy.
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The Brasher Doubloon (1947; John Brahm)
George Montgomery is a more pleasant detective Philip Marlowe in a quippy, smart, twisted and softer-boiled mystery than the Humphrey Bogart or Robert Montgomery versions. A little old lady from Pasadena hires Marlowe to find the ultra rare and valuable gold coin of the title, then dismisses him. His further snooping uncovers a mess of psychological abuse, blackmail, gambling debt, mob activity and more coins. Moody Gothic atmosphere, a mansion under a dark cloud, and a victimized secretary (Nancy Guild) more averse to human contact than the X-Men’s Rogue (not to worry, Marlowe's willing to offer unlimited therapy sessions).
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Calcutta (1947; John Farrow)
Exotic mystery-adventure with pilots Alan Ladd and William Bendix investigating the murder of their buddy, which leads them into a diamond smuggling ring and always seems to loop back to buddy’s mysterious, deceptively sweet fiance and possible black widow Gail Russell. Russell’s stunning dark beauty and Ladd’s troubled icy toughness will have you glued to the screen. He wears his distrust of women and suspicion of her like a suit of armor; Ladd’s star power and buddy-chemistry with Bendix lift the otherwise average mystery plot.
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Repeat Performance (1947; Alfred L. Werker)
Surreal crime-fantasy soap opera cocktail that opens with a bang, when stage actress Joan Leslie guns down her failed playwright husband on New Year’s Eve, then is granted her wish to re-do the whole previous year. She tries to correct things that led to the darker timeline, like keeping her hubby away from the bottle and out of another woman’s clutches, also keeping her friend away from a predatory patron and an insane asylum. Suspense comes from watching Leslie try to bend history, and deal with the same events when she can’t--maybe she’s just fated to pull that trigger again on New Year’s. Great cast including Richard Basehart, Tom Conway and Louis Hayward.
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Railroaded! (1947; Anthony Mann)
Assuming you’ve seen Anthony Mann’s other 1947 noirs--T-Men and Desperate--then try a third one of his from that year, a fast and gritty movie wherein a holdup goes wrong, a cop is killed, and the crooks frame an innocent man. That man’s sister (Sheila Ryan) has no love for the police and tries to prove her brother’s innocence by getting way too close to creepy killer John Ireland. Thankfully, she also grows close to one police detective, old friend Hugh Beaumont, whose help comes in handy when things fall apart. Ireland makes a good villain--a twisted, woman-hating voyeur who perfumes his bullets.
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Honorable mentions:
Woman on the Beach (1947; Jean Renoir)
The Gangster (1947; Gordon Wiles)
The Unsuspected (1947; Michael Curtiz)

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Underrated '47 - Ira Brooker

Ira Brooker is a writer, editor and trash cinema enthusiast living in Saint Paul, Minnesota. His Letterboxd account is a document of a life poorly spent. You can find his writing all over the place, and especially at atalentforidleness.blogspot.com, irabrooker.com and @irabrooker.
Here is his Underrated '87 list as well:
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2017/03/underrated-ira-brooker.html

Lured (Directed by Douglas Sirk)
Until viewing this film, I had no idea that “Lucille Ball, Dramatic Leading Lady” was something I needed in my life, but darned if Lucy isn’t something of a revelation playing a brassy, quick-witted taxi dancer helping Scotland Yard track down the serial killer who murdered her friend. While this early effort isn’t the Sirkiest Douglas Sirk flick you’ll ever see, it’s clearly the work of a director with a singular, budding vision.

Sirk makes great use of Ball’s skill set, frequently letting his thriller veer into comedy but never allowing the wackiness to take over. Alongside a truly excellent Lucy, you get George Sanders as her playboy love interest, George Zucco playing against type as a goofy badass inspector, and a show-stealing Boris Karloff going big as a deranged fashion designer. The story sadly peters out into a familiar police procedural in its closing act, but by then it’s built up more than enough goodwill to compensate.
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The Devil on Wheels (Directed by Crane Wilbur)
I’m not certain whether The Devil On Wheels was the first public safety film focused on the dangers of drag-racing, but it stands as one of the most fascinating. Set in the kind of blandly pleasant small town where a guy bringing home a new roadster can set the whole block buzzing for days, this one focuses on a middle-class father and son who each have some troubling issues with responsible motoring: Dad’s got a hot head and a lead foot, and Junior’s been slipping away for road races with the local hot-rod contingent.

This is as preachy and unsubtle as any governmentally commissioned scare flick, but the filmmakers actually bothered to invest in a script and actors who can, y’know, act a little. (Lead teen Darryl Hickman had a 50-year career as an actor, followed by another 30-plus as an acting coach.) You get all the expected lecturing and moralizing, but also a lot of nicely staged stunt driving and fun touches like a group of teens getting trapped in the local morgue after hours. It’s a cool time capsule from an era when cars were enough of a novelty to get pulses pounding, but also enough of a danger to justify making movies like this one.
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Johnny O'Clock (Directed by Robert Rossen)
Acerbic entrepreneur and mob associate Dick Powell is all set to hit it big with a new casino venture, but the various schemers and boneheads in his orbit are determined to hold him down. In no time flat, he’s entangled in business power struggles, illicit love affairs, and one pesky murder investigation that just won’t go away.

Writer-director Robert Rossen is clearly more comfortable in the former role, crafting a script that’s virtually nothing but blistering noir turns-of-phrase, but he pulls off some atmospheric shots when he has to. Powell is delightfully low-key in the lead, playing a jaded straight-shooter who’s slowly realizing that being the smartest guy in the room might not be enough to save his hide. The supporting cast is impeccable, including Lee J. Cobb as the quietly determined detective, Thomas Gomez as the dangerously affable mobster, Evelyn Keyes as the innocent dame, Ellen Drew as the not-so-innocent dame, and Nina Foch as the doomed dame. It’s missing an intangible something that would make it a certifiable classic, but it more than holds its own as an unjustly overlooked genre gem.
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The Upturned Glass (Directed by Lawrence Huntington)
Neurosurgeon James Mason falls in love with the married mother of one of his young patients. When his intended falls from a window to her death, Mason suspects foul play. Soon enough he’s acting as not just an amateur gumshoe, but also an amateur judge, jury, and executioner.

While it’s ultimately sort of slight, this moody, foggy psycho-thriller is pretty much everything you could ask for from a noir-adjacent British b-movie starring James Mason. The acerbic screenplay is written by Mason’s then-wife and frequent collaborator Pamela Kellino, who also comes close to stealing the film as the dead woman’s scheming, social-climbing sister-in-law. Stick around for Brefni O’Rorke’s fantastic third-act appearance as a callous country doctor who prides himself on not caring whether his patients live or die.
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New Orleans (Directed by Arthur Lubin), Hi-De-Ho (Directed by Josh Binney)
I’m always fond of music movies from the pre-television era, when seeing one of the day’s top acts wasn’t as easy as turning the dial. It only made sense for filmmakers to launch the day’s pop stars onto the silver screen and see how much would stick. How much work you wanted to sink into the movie you slapped together around them was up to you.

The 1947 Hi-De-Ho (one of several Cab Calloway features to use that title) makes the barest of efforts, entangling Cab in some nonsense about his no-good girlfriend Minnie (natch!) getting him mixed up with gamblers. For a guy who was the living embodiment of stage presence, Cab Calloway sure couldn’t act a lick, but he’s still the best actor in this cast by a wide margin. It’s a relief when Hi-De-Ho abruptly gives up on being a movie midway through and switches.to 40 minutes of electrifying live performances by Cab and his associates. As a film, it ain’t much. As a musical experience, it’s damn near essential.
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New Orleans, on the other hand, leans too far in the opposite direction. Purporting to be a historical narrative about the birth of jazz, the film pulls together a tip-top cast of musicians including Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, and Woody Herman, then makes them take a backseat to a bland story of boring white people making money and pitching woo. But again, you can’t keep a performer like Satchmo down, and the movie redeems itself every time he puts lips to horn. It helps that he’s a pretty good actor, at least when he’s playing a slight variation on himself. I wish I could say the same for Ms. Holiday, but at least her songs sound great. This is another must-see for fans of ‘40s music, and another skippable trifle for everybody else.
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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

New Release Roundup - June 27th, 2017

STRAW DOGS on Blu-ray (Criterion)
http://amzn.to/2sbnep4
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TRESPASS on Blu-ray (Shout Select)
http://amzn.to/2tbc1d7
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RUNNING ON EMPTY on Blu-ray (Warner Archive)
http://amzn.to/2tavZnP
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HELL IN THE PACIFIC on Blu-ray (Kino Lorber Studio Classics)
http://amzn.to/2u4vmJ9
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THE LODGER on Blu-ray (Criterion)
http://amzn.to/2tK8JKF
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THE PINK PANTHER FILM COLLECTION on Blu-ray (Shout Select)
http://amzn.to/2taAsqG
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THE APPLE on Blu-ray (Scorpion/Kino)
http://amzn.to/2s6CuIs
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SHAG on Blu-ray (Olive Films)
http://amzn.to/2taBu5R
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DEATH LINE on Blu-ray (Blue Underground)
http://amzn.to/2rRGQPH
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THE EVICTORS on Blu-ray (Scream Factory)
http://amzn.to/2tb8Yl6
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NURSE SHERRI on Blu-ray (Vinegar Syndrome)
http://amzn.to/2u4PCuh
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THE ANGRY RED PLANET on Blu-ray (Scream Factory)
http://amzn.to/2tKLUGU
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THE FOUR SKULLS OF JONATHAN DRAKE on Blu-ray (Scream Factory)
http://amzn.to/2rRBx2w
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VICTIMS! on Blu-ray (Olive Films)
http://amzn.to/2taEQ9d
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MONEY FROM HOME on Blu-ray (Olive Films)
http://amzn.to/2u4GF4a
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INSPECTOR CLOUSEAU on Blu-ray (Kino Lorber Studio Classics)
http://amzn.to/2u4ZrII
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CURSE OF THE PINK PANTHER on Blu-ray (Kino Lorber Studio Classics)
http://amzn.to/2tKovoW
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SON OF THE PINK PANTHER on Blu-ray (Kino Lorber Studio Classics)
http://amzn.to/2tbauns
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BEING DIFFERENT on Blu-ray (Code Red)
http://amzn.to/2s6HbC3
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THE UNHOLY on Blu-ray (Vestron)
http://amzn.to/2s6HkW7
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THE SAVAGE INNOCENTS on Blu-ray (Olive Films)
http://amzn.to/2u4ML4J
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THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE on Blu-ray (Scream Factory)
http://amzn.to/2tKROrI
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THE ROCKFORD FILES: COMPLETE SERIES on Blu-ray on Blu-ray (Mill Creek)
http://amzn.to/2sRcCgW
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