Rupert Pupkin Speaks: Film Discoveries of 2017 - Jackson Stewart ""

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Film Discoveries of 2017 - Jackson Stewart

Jackson Stewart is a writer/director living in Los Angeles. He created the web series 'The Cartridge Family' and wrote for the CW show Supernatural. He recently directed the horror film BEYOND THE GATES (which I am a big fan of) and is currently working on a sequel to that film as well as other projects. BEYOND THE GATES was co-written by RPS friend and contributor Stephen Scarlata. 
Check out BEYOND THE GATES Here:
http://amzn.to/2HKWeop

Jackson is on twitter @bossjacko.
Here are his discoveries list from last few years:
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2017/01/film-discoveries-of-2016-jackson-stewart.html
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2016/02/film-discoveries-of-2015-jackson-stewart.html
http://www.rupertpupkinspeaks.com/2014/12/favorite-film-discoveries-of-2014_26.html
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The Devil's Honey (1986)
I first heard about this through my friend Ben Davis Collins (Super Dark Times); I took one look at the cover and raced down to Amoeba and bought it that day. The cashier warned me that the movie was "a little sleazy" which should have tipped me off that this was more than your standard smut/exploitation film. Fulci making a sleazy erotic film is akin to watching a close family friend have sex in front of you, it's chilling, deeply UN-erotic and psychologically traumatizing. The male lead Johnny is sort of an Italian Mickey Rourke; his chief loves are saxophone, getting handjobs whilst riding his motorcycle and a really discomforting three-way with his sound mixer. I've never seen anything like this movie and I doubt I will again. 10/10
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Madhouse (1981)
A peculiar Italian horror entry centered around twins. Surprisingly the crazy dubbing, intense acting styles and garish design isn't on display here. The brilliant Ovidio Assonitis (The Visitor) directed and seems far more reined in on this outing. The cinematography is lush and he deserves major credit for casting real disabled kids in their roles. A movie I am surprised I missed but very happy to have finally seen thanks to the new blu-ray.
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The Border (1982)
Jack Nicholson stars as a border patrol cop with a whole mess of personal problems. I caught this at the New Beverly in 2017 and was surprised it had somehow slipped by me. Nicholson and Karen Black both turn in terrific performances -- the movie contains an explosive climax, a great Walon Green script and Nicholson squaring off with Keitel years before The Two Jakes. Seek it out.
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Moby Dick (1956)
John Huston handled this excellent adaptation of Herman Melville's seminal novel about one man's quest for revenge. The casting of Gregory Peck as Ahab initially raises an eyebrow but he handles it with a surprising amount of surly grit. Ahab's dark obsession believably guides us through the film and meets its only natural conclusion. Huston's at the top of his game here and this is a weirdly under-loved film from his catalog.
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Hercules In The Haunted World (1961)
Mario Bava directed this strange sword and sorcery picture. Hercules journeys to Hades and we're treated to impressive fight choreography, incredible old school fx and style to burn from Italy's original master of horror. It's somewhat in the vein of Army Of Darkness and I'd be surprised if this wasn't a big influence on Sam Raimi's career.
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